Since inception, with only three staff a little over five years ago, Transparency Maldives (TM) has expanded and diversified, undertaking anti-corruption research and advocacy programs, and consequently widening our network partnership to include several of the key institutions. TM has become a reliable force in combating corruption and promoting good governance in the Maldives. We have also become a credible voice both nationally and internationally for our efforts in leading the systematic observation of the heavily contested 2013 Presidential election, where we employed cutting edge methods and international standards in observing the election, and deployed over 400 observers across the country.

 

Having established our relevance in the national public sphere and society, at a time when the corruption scale is worsening amid extreme politicization of institutions and polarization of society, we are committed to working with our wide and diverse stakeholder base, despite the many challenges ahead in establishing tangible measures against corruption in the Maldives.

 

Using Transparency International’s best practice guidelines and with extensive stakeholder discussions analysing our priorities, Professor Arjuna Prakrama guided our stakeholder dialogue and supported the development of this strategic plan under severe personal health challenges. We thank Professor Prakrama for his contribution as the consultant for this plan.

 

We are also grateful to Transparency International for funding this project. We would also like to congratulate and thank, Iham Mohamed, TM’s previous Executive Director, for directing the project and Thoriq Hamid for managing and overseeing the successful completion of the project. I also thank all who participated in this deliberative process.

 

It is hoped that this strategic plan will guide us further and increase our collective strength in the fight against corruption to achieve progressive gains in all aspects of our multi-pronged campaign to save our society from the pernicious effects and resiliency of corruption.

 

Click to view/download the strategic plan


9 and 12 January 2013

The National Advisory Committee (NAC) for Elections for the Local Council Elections was first convened on 9 January 2014 with a subsequent meeting held on 12 January 2014.

Updates by the Elections Commission
  • For the first time in Maldives, the voter registry will include photos of voters to ensure easier identification of the voter.
  • Deadline for candidates and parties to sign copies of photo voter registry concluded on 11 January. All political parties except PPM have signed all the lists.
  • Training of polling officials are currently underway in the islands.
  • Elections Commission is facing difficulties in carrying out activities due to budgetary constraints.
Other Points of Note
  • The Elections Commission informed the NAC that the Supreme Court guidelines are an impediment to proper conduction of the elections. Issues such as the requirement for all candidates to sign the voter lists before being dispatched are issues that remain unresolved. As it stands, the Elections Commission will be sending out ballot papers to the islands without the signature of some of the candidates or their representatives.
  • Two cases regarding candidacy currently underway at Supreme Court may affect the election being conducted on 18 January.
About the National Advisory Committee for Elections

The National Advisory Committee for Elections is convened by the Elections Commission and is the highest statutory advisory body for elections. The committee comprises the five members of the Elections Commission, a representative of each political party fielding candidates, a member of the Maldives Broadcasting Commission, Maldives Media Council and the Human Rights Commission of the Maldives, a representative of the Maldives Police Service, civil society and the Department of National Registration.

Transparency Maldives’ (TM) Advocacy and Communications Manager, Aiman Rasheed sits on the National Advisory Committee for Elections as the civil society representative.


The Climate Finance Integrity Programme was piloted in 2011 by Transparency International in six countries, including the Maldives, to monitor the increasing climate related finance, the governance of raising and managing these funds and the governance of these funds within the selected countries. This report is the national report for the mapping assessment conducted for Maldives. The research has briefly looked at all government institutions that were active during the research phase, from 2011 to mid-2013, in the delivery and monitoring of climate change projects that were funded by the government or externally.

 

Read the full report here Assessment of Climate Finance in the Maldives


When the only education loan scheme for students in Maldives announced awardees, ALAC received complaints from some applicants who pointed out inconsistencies in how the points were given to different applicants and alleged that some applicants were unduly favoured when awarding points. Following ALAC’s intervention, Anti-Corruption Commission (ACC) took on the case and a re-evaluation of the applicants was ordered.

The Tertiary Education Loan Scheme, worth MVR 68 million (about US$ 4.4 million), was launched in June 2013 by the Ministry of Education. The scheme facilitates tertiary education opportunities in the Maldives as well as abroad. Under the scheme students were allowed to apply for study abroad if the courses they apply for were not available in the Maldives. A total of 650 students applied for the scheme, out of which 250 were to be chosen.

As the Ministry of Education was planning to award the loans on the day after the applicants getting the loans were announced, ALAC advised the complainants to go directly to the ACC and lodge the complaint as an urgent case. ALAC coordinated with the complainants during the complaint lodging process to the conclusion of the issue by ACC. ACC acted on the complaint immediately, stopping the awarding ceremony and ordering the Ministry of Education to re-evaluate the vetting procedure.

Read more about the case here http://minivannews.com/politics/acc-orders-re-evaluation-of-overseas-student-loan-scheme-74704


Access to information legislation crucial to fight corruption

PRESS RELEASE

Date: December 29, 2013

The passage of the Access to Information bill by the Parliament today was an important step towards increasing transparency of the state institutions, ensuring greater accountability of public officials, and fighting corruption.

Transparency Maldives hopes that President Abdulla Yamin Abdul Gayoom will expedite the ratification of the bill.We call on all actors and institutions to provide their full support towards successfully implementing the law once ratified.

 

ENDS

 

For all media queries, please contact Advocacy and Communications Manager, Aiman Rasheed on 00 960 7908967.

 

The press release is linked here in English and Divehi


Clarification on the reported numbers of the ‘An Assessment on Climate Finance Governance’ report:

 

Maldives has been pledged USD 130 million from 2008 through 2015 for environment and climate change related projects. Some projects financed through the USD 130 million have been concluded while others are currently ongoing. The figure is not MVR 130 billion as reported by some news sources.

 

We apologize for the misinformation.

 

‘An Assessment on Climate Finance Governance’ is a research conducted in 6 countries by Climate Finance Integrity Project’s by the respective Transparency International chapters.

 

This assessment is based on expert interviews and mapping on how funds have been received and utilized. We highlight the main findings and recommendations of the assessment on climate finance governance in Maldives.

 

See the following link for a summary of the report in Dhivehi and the complete report can be found in English at this link.


The Global Corruption Barometer (GCB) surveys opinions and experiences of the public on corruption. The GCB is one of the tools utilized by TI in understanding corruption.

 

Transparency International (TI) is a global movement sharing one vision: a world in which government, business, civil society and the daily lives of people are free of corruption. Transparency Maldives is the national contact of TI in Maldives.

 

Click to view/download the Global Corruption Barometer Survey 2013 in English and Dhivehi

 

Download
Global Corruption Barometer Survey 2013


PRESS RELEASE

 

Date: November 16, 2013

 

Transparency Maldives appreciates and thanks all observers and volunteers in our observer network, based in 20 atolls and in London, Singapore, Colombo, Kuala Lumpur, Delhi and Trivandrum. The observers were key to the success of the observation. Transparency Maldives believes that an independent observation effort at this scale has instilled greater levels of trust in our electoral processes. Our observers have ensured increased public participation and the transparency of electoral processes in the Maldives.

 

Transparency Maldives has participated in international election observation missions, including Nepal, Bangladesh, United States, Sri Lanka and Thailand. Transparency Maldives is also affiliated with many domestic and international elections observation and electoral knowledge networks including ANFREL and GNDEM. The election observation effort by Transparency Maldives in this Presidential election has been guided by the National Democratic Institute.

 

The methodology used for our observation was based on systematic random sampling. Our observers collected both qualitative and quantitative data and our approach allowed us to generate results from the sample to the entire population, within a known margin of error. In this case our margin of error is less than +/- 1.5%.

 

The elections were credible, transparent and extremely well-administered, as were the two previous rounds. Transparency Maldives congratulates the Maldivian citizens for their spirited engagement in the democratic process, with unprecedented voter turnout. Transparency Maldives congratulates the winning candidate Abdulla Yameen Abdul Gayoom and his supporters. Transparency Maldives also congratulates President Nasheed and his supporters, in this closely contested election. Transparency Maldives urges all actors to respect and accept the election results and swear in the next president at the earliest.

 

The following are the key findings which we would like to highlight. 99.6% of polling stations closed by 5.00 p.m.

 

There were reports that people were not able to vote because their names were not on the voter registry, but this affected very few cases (less than 0.07% of all voters). Out of those affected (0.04%) of voters complained at the polling stations.

 

1.7% of the total voter turnout were assisted voters spread across 79.6% of the polling stations.

 

Voting was temporarily halted in 4.4% of polling stations. 50% of these cases were interventions at the direction of the Presiding Officer while 60% were interventions by political party supporters/affiliates.

 

We are happy to report that this election has been peaceful with no reported incidents of violence inside a polling station.

 

We note that the police entered 14.2% of polling stations. However, in 84.4% of such cases, interventions occurred at the invitation of the Presiding Officer as the rules allow.

 

Candidates were well-represented during the counting, making the process transparent and adding to its credibility. Abdulla Yameen was represented at 87.1% of polling stations during the vote count. Mohamed Nasheed was represented at 93.3% of polling stations during the vote count.

 

Only 0.11% of ballot papers were disputed by the candidate/party observers during the counting process.

 

While election day administration has been excellent, we believe that the real electoral issues are those of lack of political financing transparency, failure of the state to hold to account parties and individuals in violation of electoral offenses, the loopholes in the legal framework which paves way for abuse, all of which ultimately reduces trust and confidence in the electoral system.

 

Transparency Maldives calls on all relevant actors to reform the electoral systems to increase confidence in and improve the electoral systems in the Maldives.

 

ENDS

 

For media inquiries please contact Aiman Rasheed, Advocacy and Communications Manager on 00 960 7908967.

 

See the following links for this statement in Dhivehi and English


PRESS RELEASE

 

Date: November 16, 2013

 

Transparency Maldives thanks our observers deployed across the country for their dedication in observing the election processes. Transparency Maldives observer network has a wide national coverage spanning resorts, prisons, and abroad, including London, Singapore, Kuala Lumpur, Colombo, Trivandrum and Delhi.

The results we report are generalisable to the entire country. These results are based on the observation at the time of opening of polls.

 

The opening of the polls was smooth, and the administrative preparation and execution went well, showing an improvement over the previous two rounds of the Presidential Election. The Elections Commission and relevant stakeholders deserve credit for the smooth opening of polls. The opening procedure went well with 100% of all polling stations open by 8.00am and 91.89% of polling stations open within the first 10 minutes of the required opening time, compared to the first round’s 86.2%.

 

Nearly all polling station officials were in place at all polling stations. The queue controller and polling station controller were absent at only 0.9% of polling stations.

 

The materials required for voting were present and the ballot papers were counted and reconciled at all polling stations. All ballot boxes were verified as empty at the start.

 

Candidates were well represented at polling stations. One or more candidate/party observers were present at 92.4% of all observed polling stations whilst no candidate/party observer was present in 7.7% of cases.

Transparency Maldives also notes that police were present at 95.9% of the observed polling stations at the time of opening, similar to the last round.

 

Observers concluded that the polling stations were set up to ensure a secret vote in 100% of polling stations .

We encourage all parties to maintain the climate of peace. Our observers are working hard at polling stations and will be present at the polling stations till closing and during counting.

 

We will be informing you the precise time of our next press conference later this afternoon.

 

ENDS

 

For all media queries, please contact Advocacy and Communications Manager, Aiman Rasheed (00 960 7908967).

 

See the following links for the statement in Dhivehi and English


PRESS RELEASE

 

Date: November 11, 2013

 

Transparency Maldives is deeply concerned that the people of the Maldives have been denied the right to elect a President before the constitutional five-year term of the incumbent government expired on 11 November 2013. Transparency Maldives condemns the continued breach of the electoral deadlines, in contravention to the spirit of the Constitution.

 

It is regrettable that political actors failed to find a democratically inclusive solution to the constitutional crisis that respects the spirit of the Constitution. The spirit of the Constitution reflects the basic democratic principle that state power must always lie with the people and their elected representatives.

 

Transparency Maldives calls on all relevant actors to allow the people to elect a president to ensure that all powers of the state are derived from and remain with the citizens as stipulated in the Constitution of the Maldives.

 

ENDS

 

For all media queries, please contact Advocacy and Communications Manager, Aiman Rasheed on 00 960 7908967.

 

PDF versions of the statement in English and Dhivehi.


PRESS RELEASE

 

Date: November 9, 2013

 

Transparency Maldives appreciates and thanks the 400+ observers and volunteers in our observer network, based in 20 atolls and a number of foreign countries. Without them this domestic observation would not have been a success. Transparency Maldives believes that an independent observation effort at this scale promotes greater levels of trust in our electoral processes. Our observers have ensured increased public participation and the transparency of electoral processes in the Maldives.

 

The methodology used for this observation was based on systematic random sampling. Our observers collected both qualitative and quantitative data and our approach allowed us to generate results from the sample to the entire population, within a known margin of error. In this case our margin of error is less than +/- 1.5%.

 

The following are the key findings we would like to highlight.

 

48% of polling stations closed at 3:30 p.m and 96% of polling stations closed by 4.30 p.m.

 

There were reports that people were not able to vote because their names were not on the voter registry, but this affected very few cases (less than 0.35% of all voters). Out of those affected 23.1% complained at the polling stations that they were unable to vote at their designated polling location.

 

1.4% of the total voter turnout were assisted voters spread across 81.4% of the polling stations.

 

Voting was temporarily halted in 3.2% of polling stations. 85.7% of these cases were interventions at the direction of the Presiding Officer.

 

Despite a few isolated cases of reported violence (1.8%) at the polling stations, we are happy to report that this election has been peaceful. Where there were incidents of violence, they were reported to the relevant authorities, and we will be closely monitoring any further developments.

 

We note that the police entered 14.5% of polling stations. However, in 84.4% of such cases, interventions occurred at the invitation of the Presiding Officer as the rules allow.

 

Candidates were well-represented during the counting, making the process transparent and adding to its credibility. Gasim Ibrahim was represented at 83.7% of polling stations during the vote count. Abdulla Yameen was represented at 85.1% of polling stations during the vote count. Mohamed Nasheed was represented at 91% of polling stations during the vote count.

 

Only 0.15% of ballot papers were disputed by the candidate/party observers during the counting process.

 

ENDS

 

For media inquiries please contact Aiman Rasheed, Advocacy and Communications Manager on 00 960 7908967.

 

See the following links for this statement in English and Dhivehi.


PRESS RELEASE

 

Date: November 9, 2013

 

Transparency Maldives thanks the 400+ observers deployed across the country for their dedication in observing the election processes. Transparency Maldives observer network has a wide national coverage spanning resorts, prisons, and abroad, including London, Singapore, Kuala Lumpur and Colombo.

 

The results we report are generalisable to the entire country. These results are based on the observation at the time of opening of polls.

 

The opening of the polls was smooth, and the administrative preparation and execution went well, for which the Elections Commission and relevant stakeholders deserve credit. The opening procedure went well with 99% of all polling stations open by 8.00am and 86% of polling stations open within the first 10 minutes of the required opening time.

 

Nearly all polling station officials were properly in place at all polling stations. The queue controller was absent at 2% and the polling station controller was absent at 2% of observed polling stations.

 

The materials required for voting were present and the ballot papers were counted and reconciled at all polling stations and all ballot boxes were verified as empty at the start.

 

Candidates were well represented at polling stations. Two or more candidate/party observers were present at 94.6% of all observed polling stations whilst no candidate/party observer was present in 5.4% of cases.

 

Transparency Maldives also notes that police were present at 95.1% of the observed polling stations at the opening time.

 

Observers concluded that the polling stations were set up to ensure a secret vote in the vast majority of cases (97.5%). This was less clear in about 2.5% of all cases observed. These polling stations will be closely watched.

 

We encourage all parties to maintain the climate of peace. Our observers are working hard at polling stations and will be present at the polling stations till closing.

 

We will be informing you the precise time of our next press conference later this afternoon.

 

ENDS

 

For all media queries, please contact Advocacy and Communications Manager, Aiman Rasheed (00 960 7908967).

 

See the following links for the press statement in English and Dhivehi.