Applications are now open for the 2016 Youth Integrity Camp!

Youth Integrity Camp 2016, Hanimaadhoo, 10 – 14 February 2016
View/download the Youth Integrity Camp 2016, Hanimaadhoo application form.

Under the Youth Integrity Project, TM is conducting a 5 day Youth Integrity Camp from 10 – 14 February 2016, in Hanimaadhoo to capacity build 30 young leaders on critical thinking, decision-making, resource mobilization and advocacy and communication skills with thematic focus on youth and public policy, youth mainstreaming, governance, corruption and youth movements.

Applications are open to 18- 24 year olds from Hanimaadhoo, Kulhudhuffushi, Nolhivaranfaru and Nolhivaram, who are enthusiastic about initiating and being part of a youth integrity movement and enthusiastic about being a change-maker and a positive role model in the society.

Deadline for submission of applications is 1800 hrs on February 1, 2016. 
Send your applications to naji.hameed@transparencymaldives.org or send your applications to your local contacts:

HDh. Hanimaadhoo
Ibrahim Khaleel
794 5805

HDh. Kulhudhuffushi
Abdullah Mohamed
794 5223

HDh. Nolhivaranfaru
Abdullah Waheed
798 3848

HDh. Nolhivaram
Mohamed Shafeeu
790 0767


Applications are now open for the 2016 Youth Integrity Camp!

Youth Integrity Camp 2016, Fuvahmulah, 27 – 31 January 2016
View/download the Youth Integrity Camp 2016, Fuvahmulah application form.

Under the Youth Integrity Project, TM is conducting a 5 day Youth Integrity Camp from 27 – 31 January 2016, in Fuvahmulah to capacity build 30 young leaders on critical thinking, decision-making, resource mobilization and advocacy and communication skills with thematic focus on youth and public policy, youth mainstreaming, governance, corruption and youth movements.

Applications are open to 18- 24 year olds from Fuvahmulah and Addu City, who are enthusiastic about initiating and being part of a youth integrity movement and enthusiastic about being a change-maker and a positive role model in the society.

Deadline for submission of applications is 1800 hrs on January 16, 2016. 
Send your applications to naji.hameed@transparencymaldives.org or send your applications to your local contacts:

Gn. Fuvahmulah
Samsul Jabeen
765 8497

Addu City, Hithadhoo
Ali Faaig
744 6865

Hulhumeedhoo, Addu City
Mohamed Ayyub Muruthala Mansoor
999 2655


Applications are now open for the 2015 Youth Integrity Camp!

Download/view the Youth Integrity Camp 2015 Application form.

Under the Youth Integrity Program, TM is conducting a 3 day Youth Integrity Camp from 20-22 January 2015, to capacity build 30 young leaders on critical thinking, decision-making, resource mobilization and advocacy and communication skills with thematic focus on youth and public policy, youth mainstreaming, governance, corruption and youth movements.

Applications are open to 16- 24 year olds, who are enthusiastic about initiating and being part of a youth integrity movement and enthusiastic about being a change maker and a positive role model in the society. Applicants are also required to be able to fully participate in all activities of the Youth Integrity Camp.

Deadline for submission of applications is 1800 hrs on December 24, 2014.

Send your applications along with your CV to naji.hameed@transparencymaldives.org. Please note that only shortlisted candidates will be contacted after the review process.


Approximately 51% of the Maldivian population is under the age of 25 (UNFPA, 2012) and is often an untapped resource that could identify needs, develop policies, provide long-term solutions and offer an intellectual capital. Transparency Maldives views this as an opportunity to engage a majority of the population in creating the demand for governance and integrity in public life. The Government of Maldives too, has identified increasing youth participation and empowerment as a high priority in shaping future strategies for development.

Under the Youth Integrity Program, TM seeks to understand the role young people can carve out to act as agents of change and increase youth awareness on corruption. This project is in line with the strategic priority areas of TM, which seeks to increase advocates for anti-corruption by mobilising young people.

The main goal of this project is to inculcate future leaders with integrity and develop advocates for anti-corruption. The project will contribute to achieving the following objectives:

  1. Increase understanding of youth issues and role in fighting corruption
  2. Empower, educate and engage youth in the fight against corruption
  3. Increase youth participation in decision making processes and establish their role as change makers

These objectives will be achieved through a series of activities. TM will conduct a 3 day Youth Integrity Camp to capacity build 30 young leaders on decision-making, resource mobilisation and communication skills with thematic focus on public policy, governance and youth mainstreaming. (Applications are now open for the Youth Integrity Camp 2015)

As a follow up of the Youth Integrity Camp, an integrity pledge will be signed by the 30 youth leaders forming a Youth Integrity Network (YIN) that will work as a network of young change makers in the fight against corruption. The YIN will then hold two youth forums in collaboration with the Maldives National University to discuss youth participation and other sub-themes identified through discussions among the YIN.

Under the Youth Integrity Program policy workshops will be conducted between policy makers and youth stakeholders to create dialogue on youth mainstreaming policies, explore opportunities for collaboration and increase youth participation in decision making processes.


14 March 2014, Dhaalu Kudahuvadhoo –

Transparency Maldives conducted Democracy Talks in Dhaalu Atoll Education Centre for students of Grade 9. The main objective of this program was promoting values of democracy among children for increased civic participation. The content of the sessions included fundamentals of democracy, human rights, civic responsibilities, the role of young citizens and how they can actively engage themselves in their local community. 32 students from grade nine participated in the program. Students found the program very useful and was well received by participants and school staff alike.

 

Students were given an overview of Transparency Maldives as a civil society organization fighting corruption and promoting good governance.

 

 

 

What do we mean by democracy? We have become more familiarised with the term and the processes associated with democracy more recently with the onset of democratic developments in Maldives since 2008. The recent wave of democratisation known as the “Arab spring (Arabeenge Bahaaru moosun)” is an example of recent democratic developments among Muslim/Arab nations.

 

One of the sessions on this training was introducing democracy as a form of government where the constitution guarantees basic personal and political rights, free and fair elections, independent courts of law and equal rights. We discussed the importance of bringing together diverse groups of people and engaging them in dialogue, and the protection of minority rights as a core concept of democracy.

 

Students discussing the importance and advantages of living in a country with a democratic form of government. They also discussed and identified issues and problems with alternative types of regimes such as a military dictatorship.

 

Students discussed ideas on identifying community problems and engaged in mapping exercises. Later on, they were divided into groups where each group was given a set of community role cards and they were asked to choose roles they thought that they played in their community. The purpose of this activity was for the students to understand that they too had a role to play in their community, and encourage them to support their communities directly and indirectly, through their participation.

 

 

Students discussed issues in their community and presented ideas on addressing such issue in their community as “positive citizens”, while being engaged in their community life.

 

 

 

Based on the feedback gathered at the end of the program, students expressed that they learned much from the sessions on basic principles of democracy, role of state institutions, and the importance of citizens’ participation in their own communities.

 

We would like to thank Dhaalu Atoll Education Centre’s administration and the students for giving us this opportunity.

 

CPP is supported by the International Foundation of Electoral Systems (IFES) and funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

 


Public participation is essential to improve local governance, hold public officials accountable and to reduce corruption. Public participation in governance creates a community that is well informed on policy and decision making in their local/national governments, understands how to address and approach local issues and work together with local leaders to reach solutions.

Transparency Maldives conducted civic education and civic forum workshops designed to increase civic education and encourage communities to participate in their local communities, politically and socially to enhance their quality of life. In the workshops held in partnership with local CBOs in over 12 islands, TM’s team worked with participants who joined us from all walks of life, to identify the most pressing issues in their communities, how to open dialogue about those issues and work with the local government, institutions and civil society groups to address issues.

After the workshop our partner council called for a civic forum open to all local residents, and successfully conducted civic forums discussing issues, concerns and possible solutions.

Civic forums were held in M.Muli and Dh.Kudahuvadhoo and was attended by local council leaders, police, educators, WDCs and a number of local residents. Our objective was to create a culture that initiated dialogue between local residents, government institutions and bridge the gap between local issues and reaching solutions as a community.


Over 70 local residents attended a civic forum held by M.Muli local government to discuss future plans and issues.

After TMs workshops and civic forum the M. Muli local government adopted the civic forum style meeting and conducted their own civic forums during the second and third week of March. Muli local government took the initiative to conduct these forums to create a platform to discuss their future plans with the public and to give an opportunity for the people to clarify their doubts regarding the council’s work and increase transparency and establish good governance at council level. The meeting also served as an opportunity for locals to give feedback to the council.

In the two civic forums council took a poll to identify issues that needed immediate attention and discussed the issues of waste management, cleaning and issues like lack of light post on entrance channel to island and possible solutions. Over 70 people attended both meetings and the discussion was lively and constructive.

Civic Participation Project is supported by the International Foundation of Electoral Systems (IFES) and  funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID)


TM’s Civic Participation Project team recently conducted civic forums in Lh. Naifaru, Gn. Fuvahmulah and S. Hulhumeedhoo. CBOs from the three islands were recruited to partner with TM, to conduct civic education workshops followed by a ‘Rayyinthunge Bahdhaluvun’ or the civic forum.

This pilot program was designed to increase civic participation with respect to increasing citizens’ willingness and ability to engage in political processes, thereby contributing to holding public officials to account and tackling corruption at community level.

Rayyithunge Bahdhalvun - Hulhumeedhoo Addu City
Rayyithunge Bahdhalvun – Hulhumeedhoo, Addu City

Citizen engagement in these civic forums, designed similar to town-hall style meetings, provided citizens a platform to engage in community affairs and apply democratic principles to address community issues.

In the three target islands, the civic education workshop and the civic forum was attended by police staff, members of Women’s Development Committees (WDCs), Councils, NGOs, health centers, schools and local leaders and political affiliates. Following a community issues identifying exercise the key issues facing these communities include the problem of drug abuse facing a large majority of youth, unemployment, and waste and sanitation issues.

At the civic forums, participants voiced the need for more public meetings and avenues for such similar public discussions in the future.

The civic education workshops and civic forums are supported by the International Foundation of Electoral Systems (IFES) and  funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).


The lack of knowledge in the fast evolving landscape of global climate finance was evident in recent public sessions organized by Transparency Maldives, despite the image of Maldives as the poster child of climate change impacts in the global media. These sessions were held to increase participation of the general public in an e-learning course that was developed by Transparency International, with the purpose of spreading awareness of corruption risks in climate finance. The online course, designed for the general public, can be completed at the individual’s own pace.

Transparency Maldives conducted four sessions in December 2013 to guide interested participants through the course. The sessions allowed discussions, exchange of knowledge and opinions. Participants were given information on the main findings from the recent research by Transparency Maldives on climate finance issues in the Maldives.

Participants of Youth Leadership Programme of 2013
Participants of Youth Leadership Programme of 2013

Special invitations were also extended to the students of BSc in Environmental Sciences at the Maldives National University, staff of relevant government offices and participants of the Youth Leadership Program, organized by Democracy House, a local NGO. A total of 33 participants participated in four sessions held in December 2013. An additional 29 persons had signed up for the e-learning course directly.

Student of BSc in Environmental Sciences Maldives National University The course builds on technical knowledge of the students to complement practical challenges of implementation
Student of BSc in Environmental Sciences, Maldives National University. The course builds on technical knowledge of the students to complement practical challenges of implementation

The structure of the course and its presentation helped participants from diverse backgrounds and levels of technical knowledge, follow the discussions and complete the course.

Commenting on the main take-away of the course, Malaka Abdul Hameed, Senior Planning Officer of the Ministry of Tourism said, “I learnt a lot about the different forms of corruption and how it impacts climate finance governance.

”The course contains three modules. The first module is an Introduction to Climate Finance.This contains a brief background to causes and impacts of climate change and how different countries respond. The module then goes on to explore the sources of climate finance and how these funds are currently channeled to the affected countries.

The mix of graduate students and government staff allowed lively discussions and exchange of experiences
The mix of graduate students and government staff allowed lively discussions and exchange of experiences

The second is Corruption Risks and Solutions. It includes introduction to types of corruption and provides real stories of how climate finance has been affected by corruption.

This combination of topics makes the course useful for those who are learning about the issues, working in implementing or monitoring these projects, or those interested in ensuring climate sustainability.

In my opinion, the biggest challenge to ensuring climate finance transparency, is the lack of availability of relevant information,” Haleemath Layan Abdulla, aged 16, a participant of the e-learning course said.

The course also includes a discussion forum, where participants may network, post comments and thoughts on the issues covered.

The course is available to any interested person to sign up.  Please contact TM if you have any queries or wish to organize sessions.

The course was developed as part of the Climate Finance Integrity Program, a research and advocacy program conducted by 6 chapters and TI-S to assess risks to Climate Finance. The CFIP program was funded by the German Ministry of Environment.


Transparency International launched the Climate Finance Integrity Program (CFIP) in 2011, to promote transparency and accountability in the increasing volume of funds being allocated for climate change adaptation and mitigation. The countries involved in the Program work to assess the risks and find solutions to ensure that these funds are not lost due to corruption or embezzlement. This will contribute to more effective climate finance, which meets adaption and mitigation objectives and better achievement of related poverty reduction and development goals

The CFIP is funded by the German Ministry of Environment and is being implemented in Mexico, Kenya, Bangladesh, Papua New Guinea, Peru and the Maldives, administered by Transparency International. The first phase of the Program is expected to be completed by end of 2013.

 

The main activities of the Phase 1 of CFIP are:

  1. Develop a map of the climate finance coming into the country in order to capture the money flow and the relationships between the institutions that are handling climate money. Once developed this map will be available online for public viewing and will be updated to reflect changes (such as new institutions or new projects coming into Maldives).
  2. Identify institutions responsible for the largest share of climate finance, and carry out in-depth assessment of these key institutions. The assessment will look into the institutions anti corruption safeguards, transparency, accountability and capacity in handling the climate finance.
  3. Develop a national climate governance network to support the work done by the program and to discuss issues raise and solutions. This network will build on existing knowledge within other civil society groups, government offices and private institutions, individuals to complement the information gathered by chapters.
  4. Develop an e-learning course to enhance stakeholder awareness of climate change funds and global agreements, avenues of funding and to ensure more transparent and accountable use of climate funds.

 

If you wish to become involved, please send an email to office@transparencymaldives.org to become a network member or to clarify any queries.

 

If you wish to learn more about climate change funds and how the current projects are designed, sign-up for the e-learning course. The course will take approximately 3 hours and will introduce the relevant international discussions and ongoing climate change programs. The course content is designed to be non-technical.


International Right to Know day on 28th September 2012 at the Maldives National University

 

International Right to Know day on 28th September 2012, at the Maldives National University.

 

Transparency Maldives organized a panel discussion on promoting access to information to mark the International Right to Know day on 28th September 2012, at the Maldives National University (MNU).

 

The panelists covered the relationship between freedom of information and democracy; public participation, good governance; and between right to information and corruption in their presentations. The panelists also highlighted the shortcomings in the current RTI legal framework and looked at the features of an ideal RTI regime.

 

The panelists were:

Mr. Muaviz Rasheed, Vice President of the Anti Corruption Commission.

Uz. Mohamed Anil, Chairperson of Democracy House.

Mr. Aiman Rasheed, Advocacy Manager of Transparency Maldives.

 

The event was recorded and aired on TVM and Raajje TV.


IMG_0093

 

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On April 18th, Transparency Maldives, in association with the Student Union of Faculty of Shari’ah and Law at the Maldives National University, held an open discussion forum on Money in politics. More than 40 law students participated in the discussion, held at the University. The discussion was part of an ongoing event-series named Legal Talks organized by the Student Union that brings together law students for debate and dialogue on various issues of pertinence.

 

Transparency Maldives collaborated with the Student Union in an effort to broaden its outreach to the general public and advocate for reform in the area of political financing, through grassroots demand. The current advocacy work is part of the Crinis Project, a research and advocacy project on political financing carried out by Transparency Maldives, with funding from the British Government’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office. The Crinis Project was developed by Transparency International and the Carter Center in 2006-2007, and has been used as a diagnostic and advocacy tool on political financing in several countries across the globe.

 

Transparency Maldives conducted the research and published the report in January 2012 and can be download here.The report highlights areas for reforming the legal framework and practices associated with political financing and provides recommendations for stakeholders on improving transparency and accountability in this area.

 

The discussion forum at the University examined the dynamics between political financing, vested interests, and corruption; and gave way to a fruitful dialogue and commentary on this critical issue of political financing.