transparency-md.1

Executive Summary

Anti-Corruption Agencies (ACA) can be powerful tools in combatting corruption. When they are independent of the Government and empowered to investigate corruption allegations, they have the potential to hold even the most powerful to account. As such, The United Nations Convention Against Corruption enjoins participant countries to establish independent bodies tasked exclusively with enforcing national anticorruption efforts.

Though the 2012 Jakarta Principles broadly delineate the principles by which ACAs must abide, there is currently no comprehensive standard tool that can be internationally applied to measure their efficiency. To exploit this area of opportunity Transparency International (TI) has recently launched the ACA Strengthening (ACA) Initiative.

The ACA SI assessment tool enquires into seven dimensions: 1) ACA’s Legal Independence and Status 2) ACA’s Financial and Human Resources 3) ACA’s Detection and Investigation Function 4) ACA’s Prevention, Education and Outreach Functions 5) ACA’s Cooperation with other Organizations 6) ACA’s Accountability and Oversight 7) Public Perceptions of the ACA’s performance.

Each dimension is composed of relevant and measurable indicators scored high medium or low which are assigned the numerical values of 2, 1 and 0 respectively used to score that dimension. There are 50 indicators in total. Cumulatively they are used to score the overall performance of the ACA

Download/Read the publication here

 

transparency-md.1

TERMS OF REFERENCE

Local Governance Training Manual Development

Consultant

 

Position title: Consultant – Development of Governance Training Manual

Expected period of commitment: 05 Weeks

Application deadline: Monday, 21st August 2017

Location: Male’, Maldives

 

  1. Organization Background

Transparency Maldives (TM) is a non-partisan organization that endeavors to be a constructive force in society by promoting collaboration and discussion on corruption, transparency and accountability. Our organization seeks to engage with stakeholders from all sectors (government, business, politics and civil society, among others) to raise awareness of corruption’s detrimental effects on development and society, improve transparency and accountability in governance, and eliminate corruption from the daily lives of people.

 

Transparency Maldives received formal government registration in 2007, and is the National Contact of Transparency International (TI) in the Maldives.

 

  1. Background to the Assignment

 

TM’s “Baaru” project (Strengthening local governance in the Maldives through capacity building local councils and empowering citizens for social accountability) is a 3-year project funded by the European Union (EU). The goal of the project is to strengthen local democracy and the decentralization system in the Maldives.

 

Following the contentious 2013/2014 electoral cycle in the Maldives, the marked decline in the local democratic culture, and the lack of political accountability at both the national and local level, public trust in democratic institutions have decreased and cynicism and disillusionment with democracy and the political status quo has increased. For the long-term viability of democracy in the Maldives, a multi-pronged approach is now needed to ensure a local democratic culture, an empowered citizenry, and an open and inclusive local governance system.

 

The broader objective of this program is to support and strengthen local governance systems using a multi-pronged focus on local government authorities and citizens to deepen democracy and enhance citizen participation in democratic processes to empower citizens for social accountability. The project aims to strengthen trust and dialogue between citizens and local governments, and empower local governments to act as catalysts for development and positive change in the communities they serve.

 

As one of its key components, this project focuses on capacity building local governments through trainings to equip them with knowledge and tools to improve community engagement and service provision. In this regard, we will be conducting a 3-day training for the newly elected councilors.

 

  1. Purpose of the Assignment

Following the 2017 Local Council Elections, a new pool of councilors have been elected to local councils and there are limited institutions to provide training for these newly elected local councilors. Although the Local Government Authority (LGA) conducts orientation programs for newly elected local councilors there is room for a more comprehensive training focusing on leadership, good governance standards and practices, budgeting, island development planning, community participation and resource mobilization. This would serve to complement the ongoing orientation program provided by the LGA.

 

TM is seeking the services of a consultant to produce a comprehensive training manual for local councilors focussing on leadership, good governance standards and practices, budgeting, island development planning, community participation and resource mobilization and anti-corruption, and complement the training developed by the LGA to train the newly elected batch of local councilors.

 

The consultant is expected to assess the existing training materials and the decentralization framework, and develop a training manual for local councilors’ training. The training manual will consist of three main components: (1) the trainer’s manual, (2) the handbook for local councilors, and (3) the training assessment toolkit.

 

  1. Responsibilities of the consultant

 

The Consultant will be expected to:

  • Undertake a desk review of existing literature pertaining to local governance and trainings in the country.
  • Identify key stakeholders and conduct interviews with stakeholders to identify training needs and gaps in existing trainings.
  • Develop a training manual for master trainers which would include presentations, session outlines, notes and background reading.
  • Develop a handbook for local councilors to complement existing resources, with specific focus on good governance, anti-corruption and participatory development planning and implementation.
  • Develop an assessment toolkit, which includes (1) an evaluation to be administered both at the beginning and end of trainings to measure the impact of training and (2) data analysis tool to analyze data, for the Training of Trainers (ToT) and the trainings for councilors.
  • Conduct ToT for master trainers.
  • Collate feedback from the participants of the ToT and finalize training manual and local councilors’ handbook.

 

  1. Deliverables
  2. Submit a timeline for the deliverables, not exceeding 5 weeks (in English or Dhivehi).
  3. A 5-page brief outlining the training areas, and how it complements existing resources in the field (in English or Dhivehi).
  4. Produce and deliver a final training manual (in Dhivehi).
  5. Develop the local councilor’s handbook (in Dhivehi).
  6. Conduct a ToT based on the training manual.
  7. Develop and deliver an assessment and data collection toolkit for the training.

 

  1. Duration of the Assignment: Five (5) weeks, with expected start date in August 2017. The consultant must be based in Malé, Maldives for the duration of the assignment.

 

  1. Reporting

The Consultant will work closely with and report to the Senior Project Coordinator at TM throughout the assignment.

  1. Required Competencies
  2. Bachelor’s or a Master’s degree in a social sciences or related field.
  3. Proven ability to clearly and concisely express ideas and concepts in written and oral form.
  4. Familiarity with concepts of good governance including transparency, accountability and anti-corruption.
  5. Ability to research, analyze and synthesize information.
  6. Experience in developing training programmes for adults.
  7. Knowledge of decentralization framework and issues in the Maldivian context.
  8. Excellent spoken and written English and Dhivehi.
  9. Excellent ability to set priorities and manage time.
  10. Excellent facilitation skills

 

Closing date for applications: 04:30 pm on Monday, 21st August 2017.

 

Application and selection procedures: Interested applicants should submit an email to Shifu Omar (shifu@transparencymaldives.org). The subject line must read “Local Governance Training Manual Development Consultancy”. The content of the application should not be longer than 5 pages and must include the following:

  • A summary of relevant experience (attach a brief CV, providing evidence that you are qualified to undertake this assignment).
  • At least two examples of similar assignments that you have undertaken, preferably in the Maldives, over the past 5 years.
  • Proposed Charges (including estimates of consulting days and expenses)
  • Two relevant references.
  • Demonstrated fluency in English and Dhivehi.

TM will evaluate applications based on the following criteria:

  • Budget 25%
  • Qualification of key personnel 25%
  • Demonstrated familiarity with key concepts of decentralization and good governance 20%
  • Organizational or individual relevant experience 15%
  • Proposed Timeline 15%

 

Applications can be in English or in Dhivehi. Only short-listed candidates will be contacted.

The contract will be awarded on a lump sum/fixed cost basis, payable upon completion of deliverables. The application should state the bid amount (in MRF) for undertaking the work.

Transparency Maldives retains the right to reject any or all of the applications and/or to enter into additional negotiations with one or more of the tendering parties to help define the exact scope of the work and deliverables to be undertaken.

View/Download the TOR here

transparency-md.1

TERMS OF REFERENCE

Local Governance Training Manual Development Consultant

Position title: Consultant – Development of Governance Training Manual Expected period of commitment: 05 Weeks
Application deadline: 13th August 2017
Location: Male’, Maldives

1. Organization Background

Transparency Maldives (TM) is a non-partisan organization that endeavors to be a constructive force in society by promoting collaboration and discussion on corruption, transparency and accountability. Our organization seeks to engage with stakeholders from all sectors (government, business, politics and civil society, among others) to raise awareness of corruption’s detrimental effects on development and society, improve transparency and accountability in governance, and eliminate corruption from the daily lives of people.

Transparency Maldives received formal government registration in 2007, and is the National Contact of Transparency International (TI) in the Maldives.

2. Background to the Assignment

TM’s “Baaru” project (Strengthening local governance in the Maldives through capacity building local councils and empowering citizens for social accountability) is a 3-year project funded by the European Union (EU). The goal of the project is to strengthen local democracy and the decentralization system in the Maldives.

Following the contentious 2013/2014 electoral cycle in the Maldives, the marked decline in the local democratic culture, and the lack of political accountability at both the national and local level, public trust in democratic institutions have decreased and cynicism and disillusionment with democracy and the political status quo has increased. For the long-term viability of democracy in the Maldives, a multi-pronged approach is now needed to ensure a local democratic culture, an empowered citizenry, and an open and inclusive local governance system.

The broader objective of this programme is to support and strengthen local governance systems using a multi- pronged focus on local government authorities and citizens to deepen democracy and enhance citizen participation in democratic processes to empower citizens for social accountability. The project aims to strengthen trust and dialogue between citizens and local governments, and empower local governments to act as catalysts for development and positive change in the communities they serve.

As one of its key components, this project focuses on capacity building local governments through trainings to equip them with knowledge and tools to improve community engagement and service provision. In this regard, we will be conducting a 3-day training for the newly elected councilors.

3. Purpose of the Assignment

Following the 2017 Local Council Elections, a new pool of councilors have been elected to local councils and there are limited institutions to provide training for these newly elected local councilors. Although the Local Government Authority (LGA) conducts orientation programs for newly elected local councilors there is room for a more comprehensive training focusing on leadership, good governance standards and practices, budgeting, island

development planning, community participation and resource mobilization. This would serve to complement the ongoing orientation program provided by the LGA.

TM is seeking the services of a consultant to produce a comprehensive training manual for local councilors focussing on leadership, good governance standards and practices, budgeting, island development planning, community participation and resource mobilization and anti-corruption, and complement the training developed by the LGA to train the newly elected batch of local councilors.

The consultant is expected to assess the existing training materials and the decentralization framework, and develop a training manual for local councilors’ training. The training manual will consist of three main components: (1) the trainer’s manual, (2) the handbook for local councilors, and (3) the training assessment toolkit.

4. Responsibilities of the consultant

The Consultant will be expected to:

  • Undertake a desk review of existing literature pertaining to local governance and trainings in the country.
  • Identify key stakeholders and conduct interviews with stakeholders to identify training needs and gaps in existing trainings.
  • Develop a training manual for master trainers which would include presentations, session outlines, notes and background reading.
  • Develop a handbook for local councilors to complement existing resources, with specific focus on good governance, anti-corruption and participatory development planning and implementation.
  • Develop an assessment toolkit, which includes (1) an evaluation to be administered both at the beginning and end of trainings to measure the impact of training and (2) data analysis tool to analyze data, for the Training of Trainers (ToT) and the trainings for councilors.
  • Conduct ToT for master trainers.
  • Collate feedback from the participants of the ToT and finalize training manual and local councilors’ handbook.

5. Deliverables

  1. Submit a timeline for the deliverables, not exceeding 5 weeks (in English or Dhivehi).
  2. A 5-page brief outlining the training areas, and how it complements existing resources in the field (in English or Dhivehi).
  3. Produce and deliver a final training manual (in Dhivehi).
  4. Develop the local councilor’s handbook (in Dhivehi).
  5. Conduct a ToT based on the training manual.
  6. Develop and deliver an assessment and data collection toolkit for the training.

6. Duration of the Assignment

Five (5) weeks, with expected start date in August 2017. The consultant must be based in Malé, Maldives for the duration of the assignment.

7. Reporting

The Consultant will work closely with and report to the Senior Project Coordinator at TM throughout the assignment.

8. Required Competencies

  1. Bachelor’s or a Master’s degree in a social sciences or related field.
  2. Provenabilitytoclearlyandconciselyexpressideasandconceptsinwrittenandoralform.
  3. Familiarity with concepts of good governance including transparency, accountability and anti-corruption.
  4. Ability to research, analyze and synthesize information.
  5. Experience in developing training programmes for adults.
  6. Knowledge of decentralization framework and issues in the Maldivian context.
  7. Excellent spoken and written English and Dhivehi.
  8. Excellent ability to set priorities and manage time.
  9. Excellent facilitation skills

Closing date for applications: 04:30pm Sunday, 13th August 2017.

Application and selection procedures: Interested applicants should submit an email to Shifu Omar (shifu@transparencymaldives.org). The subject line must read “Local Governance Training Manual Development Consultancy”. The content of the application should not be longer than 5 pages and must include the following:

  • A summary of relevant experience (attach a brief CV, providing evidence that you are qualified to undertake this assignment).
  • At least two examples of similar assignments that you have undertaken, preferably in the Maldives, over the past 5 years.
  • Proposed Charges (including estimates of consulting days and expenses)
  • Two relevant references.
  • Demonstrated fluency in English and Dhivehi. TM will evaluate applications based on the following criteria:
  • Budget 25%
  • Qualification of key personnel 25%
  • Demonstrated familiarity with key concepts of decentralization and good governance 20%
  •  Organizational or individual relevant experience 15%
  • Proposed Timeline 15%

Applications

can be in English or in Dhivehi. Only short-listed candidates will be contacted.

The contract will be awarded on a lump sum/fixed cost basis, payable upon completion of deliverables. The application should state the bid amount (in MRF) for undertaking the work.

Transparency Maldives retains the right to reject any or all of the applications and/or to enter into additional negotiations with one or more of the tendering parties to help define the exact scope of the work and deliverables to be undertaken.

View/Download the TOR here

transparency-md.1

A report by Transparency International (TI) shows that Maldives fails on key points in Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16. In the scorecard illustrating the report (to be launched shortly and of which 11 countries are included) Maldives scored: just 41% for Target 16.4 (which calls for significant reduction in illicit financial flows, strengthen the recovery and return of stolen assets and combat all forms of organized crime);  a mere 33% for Target 16.5 (calling for substantial reduction in corruption and bribery in all their forms); and 81% for Target 16.10 (calling to ensure public access to information in accordance with national legislation and international agreements) 

TI_SDG_Scorecards_Maldives

Although it shows an encouraging score on some of the goals of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly those arising from access to information, Maldives fails on key issues. Much work needs to be done on asset recovery and fiscal transparency. Another worrying issue is the complete lack of protection for whistleblowers in the absence of a dedicated law and monitoring mechanisms that can insure support and safeguards for those who take the lead in alerting authorities and the public to corrupt activities. Transparency and integrity in public administration and public procurement is also far from satisfactory.

The Maldives National Progress Report submitted by the Government for the 2017 Voluntary National Review (VNR) at the High Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) was published in June 2017. Referring to SDG 16, the report states that the Government of Maldives is “committed towards creating effective, accountable and transparent institutions at all levels.”

However, Maldives has recently made national and global headlines for how corruption is embedded and systemic in the country. The current anti-corruption landscape of the country is marred by lack of enforcement of existing laws, and lack of public awareness on corruption and political accountability. To eliminate corruption in Maldives and garner public confidence in the governance system, there needs to be genuine political will to fully enforce anti-corruption laws to stop the impunity enjoyed by the corrupt and to hold corrupt politicians accountable.

The scores are out of 100 show the strength (or weakness) of the legal framework that is currently in place in each area of the policy areas covered, based on the parallel reporting methodology. The scores are plotted on the bands as indicated in the key. There is a list of policy areas covered beneath the graphic and the score for each area is placed within a band depending on the score.

 The scores read clockwise, starting with the first listed policy area between noon and one o’clock. In an ideal world, the scores for all policy areas would sit in the outer-most green band.

 For instance, the scorecard starts with anti-money laundering legislation between noon and one o’clock. Maldives is found to have a generally good legal framework for anti-money laundering (81 per cent), largely in line with international best practice, although there is room for improvement.

 Progressing clockwise around the graphic, the next area is beneficial ownership, which scores 39 per cent, indicating considerable room for improvement. The remaining percentage scores relating to each policy area are displayed in clockwise order around the rest of the graphic. 

Disclaimer

Please note that the scorecards are an appraisal of the de jure situation and do not assess compliance with the legislative framework or the effectiveness of its implementation. The legal scorecard is intended to demonstrate areas at national level in which reform of the legislative and institutional framework is most urgently needed. 

Read more on Sustainable Development Goals here.

Read more on Goal 16 and its targets here.

 

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Maldives has had five-year development plans, but no overall long term plans. Development currently depends on promises by political parties. As often happens, even existing land use plans (drawn up for some islands) are swept away to fit party pledges.

Using the following foreign and local investments that have faced difficulty over the recent years due to ad hoc policies and government changes, this governance update will attempt to highlight the dangers of pledge-based development plans compounded by a lack of national and regional development plans. 

Cases referred to in this governance update includes: the airports that has been pledged to be built in Dhigulaabaadhoo and Khulhudhuffushi; Gulhi Falhu development project; the GMR airport deal and the Tsunami aid cases.

Read the full governance bulletin here: CFIP Governance bulletin 06 – 2016

Ma bassaa header photo

Transparency Maldives has launched a campaign called “Ma Bassa”.

“Ma Bassaa” is a campaign by the Climate Integrity Project (CIP) of Transparency Maldives to advocate for and promote “Inclusive Governance”. The aforementioned title of the campaign roughly translates to “include/involve me” in Dhivehi.

Through this campaign we aim to bridge the gap between local communities; CBOs and the implementing agencies and government institutions of the country. For successful implementation of climate change projects in the Maldives, it is essential that local communities have a sense of ownership towards ongoing climate change programs

The consultations for the Assessment of Climate Finance Governance by TM showed unanimity amongst all stakeholders for the need for better governance of climate finds and the need for collaboration between donors, the government and civil society. It is this collaboration that the “Ma Bassaa” campaign aims to facilitate.

We have written a governance update on our campaign and what it entails.
Read out governance update here: Climate Integrity Project, Governance Update August 2016

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With the rapid development of the tourism and fisheries sectors, the Maldives has enjoyed a long period of robust economic growth. The average rate for real GDP increase between 2000 and 2009 has been 6%, which is one of the highest in Asia. Multiple developmental projects, categorized as climate mitigation and adaptation projects, are announced each year from harbour construction and land reclamation to housing, water and sanitation.

However, this development comes at a cost. This governance update will highlight the issues and costs of undertaking developmental projects without long term considerations of climate change mitigation and adaptation.

As Margareta Wahlstrom, the UN Assistant Secretary-General for Disaster Risk Reduction stated, “Climate change is treated as a disaster but it is a very fundamental development issue.”

The majority of the aforementioned projects are in the form of loans and grants from various international donors and organizations, worth millions of dollars, to aid the country in its efforts to combat the negative effects of climate change.

We will also be touching upon the importance of community consultation and participation when implementing developmental projects and the negative consequences of failing to do so.

Read our governance update here: Climate Finance Governance Update May 2016

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In comparison to other South Asian countries, the Maldives follows a relatively liberal labour policy and over the past 25 years migration has become a permanent feature in the Maldives labour market. Growing income inequality between countries in South Asia has added the incentive for South Asians to explore income-earning opportunities in other countries. As such, since 1990 there has been a significant expansion of the foreign migrant1 workforce in the Maldives.

This study was commissioned by the Advocacy and Legal Advice Centre (ALAC) of Transparency Maldives (TM). Established in 2012, ALAC started out as the first free legal aid centre in the Maldives and over the years the majority of the clients that seek assistance from ALAC has been migrant workers – one of the most marginalised groups in the Maldives. ALAC has assisted migrant workers in accessing justice in relation to various issues, including human rights violations, immigration and labour related issues, and injustices related to corruption.

The purpose of the study was to develop a profile of migrant workers in the Maldives, identify the key stakeholders and issues related to the migrant worker system, and recognise migrant worker trends in the Maldives. The study was undertaken through the completion of a mapping exercise and evaluation of the state mechanisms and systems which deal with migrant workers in the Maldives, in an attempt to identify systemic gaps and loopholes that are supportive of the potential for acts of corruption. The study focuses on the practices, processes and procedures that are prone to corruption in relation to the migrant worker system at the national level.

View/download the Maldives Migrant Worker System Assessment